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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

4 edition of An Analysis of weapon system cost growth found in the catalog.

An Analysis of weapon system cost growth

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Published by Rand in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • United States -- Armed Forces -- Weapons systems -- Costs.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJ.A. Drezner ... [et al.].
      ContributionsDrezner, Jeffrey A., United States. Air Force.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsUF503 .A53 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxix, 84 p. :
      Number of Pages84
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1416577M
      ISBN 100833014323
      LC Control Number93026135

      analysis purposes. It also helps those who use the results of cost analysis. References Appendix A lists the required and related publications with web sites. Explanation of abbreviations and terms The glossary explains the abbreviations and special terms used in this manual. Introduction to cost analysis a. Cost analysis is:Missing: weapon system. Joint Integrated Analysis Tool: JIAT provides a common access point to extract, store, and share data to support cost analysis. The JIAT system provides end-users the ability to run a wide variety of databases, libraries, and models. Data is made available to end-users through a distributed system of JIAT Providers hosted on the JIAT web server.

        Funding for weapons systems—which constitutes about one-third of the Department of Defense’s budget—is used to procure new systems, upgrade existing systems, and perform research, development, testing, and evaluation of new systems. CBO reviews selected weapon programs and provides a regular analysis of the long-term cost of planned weapons acquisition. acquires weapon systems and briefly discusses recent major efforts by Congress and DOD to improve the performance of the acquisition system. For a discussion on the process for dealing with significant cost growth in weapon systems, see CRS Report R, The Nunn-McCurdy Act: Background, Analysis, and Issues for Congress, by Moshe Schwartz.

      for Acquisition (SAF/AQX), to improve weapon system–acquisition outcomes and develop better cost-estimating tools for use by the acquisition community. extreme cost growth to those of programs with low cost growth to gain insights into the key cost 3 The technical director of the Air Force Cost Analysis Agency was the project monitor. Long track record of real annual growth O&S costs tend to increase with greater weapon system complexity % O&S costs as percentage of TOC remained fairly steady for many years. Source: CAPE, June Data. RDT&E. Procurement. O&S. National Interest: WSARA – May ’09 CAPE Report to Congress GAO Study - ongoing WSAR PSA – Nov ’


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An Analysis of weapon system cost growth Download PDF EPUB FB2

: An Analysis of Weapon System Cost Growth/MrAf (Project Air Force) (): Jeffrey A. Drezner, Jeanne M. Jarvaise, R. Hess, P. Hough, D. Sources of Weapon System Cost Growth: Analysis of 35 Major Defense Acquisition Programs (Project Air Force) - Kindle edition by Younossi, Obaid, Arena, Mark V., Sollinger, Jerry M., Bolten, Joseph G., Leonard, Robert S.

Download it once Cited by: Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: United States -- Armed Forces -- Weapons systems -- Costs.

Armed Forces -- Weapons systems -- Costs. United States. View all subjects; More like this: Similar Items.

Book Description: This analysis uses data from Selected Acquisition Reports to determine the causes of cost growth in 35 mature major defense acquisition programs.

Four major sources of growth are identified: (1) errors in estimation and scheduling, (2) decisions by the government, (3) financial matters, and (4) miscellaneous. Download eBook for Free Cost growth (meaning the underrun or overrun of actual vs. estimated costs) is an enduring and prevalent problem in weapon system development.

In tight budgetary times, the problem is intensified because a systematic bias in cost estimates can undermine the basis of resource allocation by:   Our analysis shows that the Department of Defense (DoD) and the military departments have generally underestimated the cost of buying new weapon systems and that this growth is higher than previously thought.

It indicates a systematic bias toward underestimating costs and substantial uncertainty in estimating the final cost of a weapon system. Abstract: Cost growth in weapon system development, one result of the inherent risk of developing advanced systems, has been a prevalent problem for many years.

A systematic bias in cost estimates can undermine the basis of resource allocation decisions, an important problem in a tight budget environment.

Currently DoD is in this situation. is intended to improve the tools used to estimate the costs of future weapon systems.

It focuses on the effects of recent technical, man-agement, and government policy changes on cost. This report builds on two earlier RAND studies, Historical Cost Growth of Completed Weapon System Programs, by Mark V.

Arena, Robert S. Leonard, Sheila. the cost growth occurred early in the acquisition phase, and the mag-nitude of development cost growth at completion for programs initi-ated in the s, s, and s remained relatively steady (Arena et al., ).

Although quantifying cost growth is important, the larger issue is why cost growth. This study examines cost growth in completed and ongoing U.S. Department of Defense weapon system programs over the past three decades and finds that development cost growth has remained high and without any significant improvement.

Product details. Paperback:. operating and support cost-estimating guide. office of the secretary of defense. cost assessment and program evaluation. march Sources of Weapon System Cost Growth by Joseph G. Bolten,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Between andtotal acquisition cost estimates for DOD’s 85 current MDAPs grew by a combined $64 billion (a 4 percent increase), growth that was driven by decisions to increase planned quantities of some weapon systems.

Book, Print in English An Analysis of weapon system cost growth J.A. Drezner [et al.]. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, xix, 84 pages: illustrations; 28 cm. Explore more options for this title.

Copies in Library - not available while library buildings are closed. Libraries Service Center MR This thesis quantitativelyanalyzesthe factorsthataffect weapon system cost growth after Milestone II.

The data from nine weapon systems was reconstructed by the Army and Navy from SelectedAcquisitionReports (SARs) withthe cost variances reclassifiedinto a new categorizationsystem to more readilydeterminethecauses of costgrowth.

$ trillion to $ trillion (fiscal year dollars). The cumulative cost growth for DOD’s programs is higher than it was 5 years ago, but at $ cost and schedule growth. Analysis of DOD Major Defense Acquisition Program Portfolios (Fiscal Year Dollars) Depiction of a Notional Weapon System’s Knowledge as Compared with.

Weapon system cost analysis (P) Unknown Binding – by G. H Fisher (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Unknown Binding, "Please retry" — Author: G.

H Fisher. DOD's portfolio of major weapon programs has grown in cost and size. GAO's analysis shows that programs initiated since had better cost performance between and than the rest of the portfolio-- an estimated $ billion decrease versus a $ billion increase.

Cost is one of the key performance parameters of the defense acquisition system; cost is controlled and traded against schedule and technical performance of weapon systems.

A new measure of cost growth (and thus cost control and tradeoffs) was developed to help look for longitudinal performance trends over the last three decades.

This book shows the major weapon systems funded in the FY President’s Budget, organized by Mission Support Activities. Each Mission Area Category chapter heading further breaks out the funding allocation in FY by subgroups, and provides a summary programmatic and financial description of the major weapon systems within each portfolio.

are not the product of cost analysis but a constraint on costs. Affordability constraints force programs may reduce the risk of readiness shortfalls and O&S cost growth later in the life cycle.

O&S Cost Management Guidebook – February 6 the United States Congress passed the Weapon System Acquisition Reform Act.GAO’s analysis of nine case studies identified four factors that frame the challenge posed by a given weapon system’s requirements: acquisition approach, technology status, design maturity, and system interdependency.

Systems engineering is the primary means for determining whether and how that challenge can be met.This thesis quantitatively analyzes the factors that affect weapon system cost growth after Milestone 2.

The data from nine weapon systems was reconstructed by the Army and Navy from Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) with the cost variances reclassified into a new categorization system to more readily determine the causes of cost growth.